Academic Components

The African Languages Initiative academic program at MS TCDC in Arusha, Tanzania will include approximately 20 hours per week of small-group Swahili instruction. In addition, students will devote four hours weekly to individual work with a language partners. Language classes will meet five days a week. Bi-weekly local excursions will be incorporated in the curriculum to complement classroom activities. All language instructors are professional teachers of the target language.

Credit

Students receive academic credit from Bryn Mawr College for their participation in the language courses administered by American Councils upon completion of the program. At the end of the program students will receive the following credits:

Undergraduates:

Fall: 4 units (16 credits)

Spring: 2 units (8 credits)

Graduates:

Fall: 3 units (15 credits)

Spring: 2 units (10 credits)

NB: Bryn Mawr College uses the unit system where one (1) undergraduate academic unit is equivalent to four (4) undergraduate semester credit hours and one (1) graduate academic unit is equivalent to five (5) graduate semester credit hours.

As each college and university has its own regulations regarding credit transfer, the participant should contact his or her home school to determine how much of this credit may be transferred upon completion of the program. We strongly recommend that this be done before the student leaves the United States. There is often a delay be­tween the end of the program and the issue of official transcripts by Bryn Mawr Col­lege. If you are a graduating senior, this delay can cause problems if arrangements have not been made in advance.

 

Courses Offered 

Fall 2017

Intermediate Swahili Grammar & Conversation

This course will be delivered using Swahili language at intermediate high and advanced levels. The course builds on the beginners and intermediate level courses taken by participants during the summer program at the University of Florida. It aims at improving participants’ Swahili language proficiency to a higher level of superior speaker and in its culturally appropriate context. The course will help learners develop skills associated with language patterns of communication found in the academic setting as well as idiomatic language found in formal and informal conversations. At the end of the course, students should be able to demonstrate effective listening, speaking, reading and writing skills necessary for everyday living, and strengthen their ability to comprehend and communicate in Swahili in diverse contexts.

Tanzania Social and Political Culture

This course aims at broadening students understanding of political and social cultural issues in Tanzania to enable them function effectively at a professional level. A range of topics such as African family structure and roles within the family, decision making in state relations in Tanzania and conflict resolution strategies and their relevance in pastoralist and farming communities will be explored. Upon completion, students should be able to compare and contrast Tanzanian and American family structures and distinguish their roles and relevance in the respective societies, gain awareness on how state relations in Tanzania function and be able to analyze conflict resolution strategies.

Swahili Literature

This course is designed for students at intermediate and advanced Swahili levels. It is aimed at enabling learners’ gain social, political and economic understanding of the Swahili or Tanzanian culture and the underlying challenges within it. It is an introductory course that is focused on building students competency in reading and analyzing Swahili literature and its themes. At the end of the course, students are expected to acquire ability to discuss and distinguish various forms of oral and written literature, explain the meaning and role of Swahili in literature and discuss the contribution of science in Swahili literature.

Spring 2018

Advanced Swahili Grammar & Conversation

This course will be conducted using Swahili language at advanced levels. It builds on the intermediate Swahili grammar and conversation course offered in the fall. It aims at developing participants’ Swahili language proficiency to a higher level of superior/distinguished speaker by exposing them to language use in its culturally appropriate context while on their internships. Listening and speaking skills associated with language patterns of communication found in the academic settings as well as the idiomatic language found in formal and informal conversations will be developed through a variety of activities. At the end of the course, students are expected to communicate to varied audiences by adapting their speech and register and be able operate in extended discourse using cultural and historical references.